Alcohol Awareness

Warning Signs and Strategies

Alcohol Awareness Month is an opportunity to raise awareness of alcohol abuse and encourage people to make healthy, safe choices.

Integrative Medicine Associates is joining other organizations across the country to honor Alcohol Awareness Month to prevent alcohol abuse in our community.

Warning Signs of Alcohol Abuse
If you answer “yes” to any of the following questions, you may have a problem with alcohol:
? Do you drink alone when you feel angry or sad?
? Does your drinking ever make you late for work?
? Does your drinking worry your family?
? Do you ever drink after telling yourself you won’t?
? Do you ever forget what you did while drinking?
? Do you get headaches or have a hangover after drinking.

Source: How to Cut Down on Your Drinking (http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/handout.htm)

Strategies to Cut Back or Quit Drinking
There are many strategies you can try to cut back or quit drinking. To get started:
? Keep track of your drinking and set a drinking limit.
? Try to avoid places where heavy drinking occurs.
? Ask for help from a doctor, family, or friends.
? If you keep alcohol in your home, keep only a limited supply.

Drinking too much alcohol can lead to health problems, including alcohol poisoning, hangovers, and an increased risk of heart disease. This April, during Alcohol Awareness Month, again, we at Integrative Medicine Associates encourage you to take this time to educate yourself and your loved ones about the dangers of alcohol abuse. In Washington alone, there have been [fill in statistics] drunk driving accidents within the past year.

To spread the word and prevent alcohol abuse, Integrative Medicine Associates is joining other organizations across the country to honor Alcohol Awareness Month to prevent alcohol abuse in our community.

If you are drinking too much, you can improve your health by cutting back or quitting. Keep track of how much you drink, avoid places where over-drinking occurs, and find new ways to deal with stress. If you are concerned about someone’s drinking, offer to help. Suggest they contact their doctor, mental health professional, or an organization specializing in substance abuse like Alcoholics Anonymous. www.aa.org or (509) 624-1442.

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